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Academic Advisory Council

Academic Advisory Council

Pablo Policzer. Assistant Professor and holder of the Canada Research Chair in Latin American Politics at the University of Calgary. His research aims to understand how to regulate coercive organizations – including militaries, police forces, and non-state armed groups, and he directs the Armed Groups Project, a research group dedicated to analyzing armed groups and their compliance with humanitarian and human rights norms. His book The Rise and Fall of Repression in Chile, will be published by the University of Notre Dame Press in 2008. Other publications include “Al Qaeda, Armed Groups and the Paradox of Engagement,” with Ram Manikkalingam, in the “Transnational and Non-state Armed Groups: Legal and Policy Challenges” Portal, hosted by Harvard University and the University of Geneva (2007); “Human Rights Violations beyond the State,” in the Journal of Human Rights (2006); and “The Charter vs. Constitutional Military Involvement in Politics,” in Canadian Foreign Policy special issue on the Inter-American Democratic Charter (2003). He obtained his PhD in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his BA (Honours) in political science from the University of British Columbia.

 

Eric Hershberg. Previously a professor of Political Science and Director of Latin American Studies at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada, and now Director of the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies at American University in Washington, D.C. He has also taught at the Universities of Wisconsin and Southern Illinois, and at Princeton, Columbia, NYU and the New School. He is President of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) and Chair of the Board of Directors of the North American Congress on Latin America (NACLA), and he consults widely for government agencies and NGOs with regard to Latin American development and educational issues in the region. His most recent publications are State and Society in Conflict: Comparative Perspectives on Andean Crises (Pittsburgh, 2006, co-edited with Paul W. Drake); Latin America After Neoliberalism: Turning the Tide in the 21st Century? (The New Press, 2006, co-edited with Fred Rosen); and “Globalization and Labor in Latin America,” forthcoming in International Labor and Working Class History.

 

David Carment. Full Professor of International Affairs at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University and Fellow of the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute (CDFAI). He is listed in Who’s Who in International Affairs. In addition Carment is the principal investigator for the Country Indicators for Foreign Policy project (CIFP). He has served as Director of the Centre for Security and Defence Studies at Carleton University and is the recipient of a Carleton Graduate Student’s teaching excellence award, SSHRC fellowships and research awards, Carleton University’s research achievement award, and a Petro-Canada Young Innovator Award. He has held fellowships at the Kennedy School, Harvard and the Hoover Institution, Stanford. His website is www.carleton.ca/~dcarment. His most recent book is on Diaspora and Canadian foreign policy. (MQUP 2007).

Cynthia Sanborn is Chair of the Department of Social and Political Sciences at the Universidad del Pacífico (UP) in Lima, Perú, where she has been a faculty member and Senior Researcher since 1996. Dr. Sanborn has been a program officer and consultant for diverse foundations and development agencies on issues related to democracy, human rights and civil society. Between 2001 and 2003 she was the William Henry Bloomberg Visiting Professor at Harvard University, and Director of the Program on Philanthropy, Civil Society and Social Change (PASCA) at that university. Her most recent publications include Moviendo Montañas: Empresas, comunidades y ONG en las industrias extractivas (CIUP 2007, with Felipe Portocarrero and Luis Camacho), The Pitfalls of Policymaking in Peru: Actors, Institutions and Rules of the Game (IADB 2006, with Eduardo Morón), and Philanthropy and Social Change in Latin America (Harvard 2005, co-edited with Felipe Portocarrero). Dr. Sanborn has a PhD and MA in Government from Harvard University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Chicago.

 

Gerardo Munck. Argentinian by birth, received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and teaches in the School of International Relations at the University of Southern California (USC). His research focuses on political regimes and democracy, methodology, and Latin America. His books include Regimes and Democracy in Latin America (Oxford, 2007); Passion, Craft, and Method in Comparative Politics (with Richard Snyder; Johns Hopkins, 2007); and Authoritarianism and Democratization. Soldiers and Workers in Argentina, 1976-83 (Penn State, 1998). He worked on Democracy in Latin America (2004), a report of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). And he is currently completing a book entitled Measuring Democracy: A Bridge Between Scholarship and Politics. He has published dozens of journal articles in the United States, Canada, England, Spain, Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico. Some of his articles and book chapters are: (with Snyder) “Debating the Direction of Comparative Politics: An Analysis of Leading Journals,” Comparative Political Studies (2007); (with Jay Verkuilen)“Democratic Politics in Latin America,” Annual Review of Political Science Vol. 7 (2004); “Tools for Qualitative Research,” in Brady and Collier (eds.), Rethinking Social Inquiry: Diverse Tools, Shared Standards (2004); (with Jay Verkuilen) “Conceptualizing and Measuring Democracy,” Comparative Political Studies (February 2002); “The Regime Question,” World Politics (October 2001); and “Game Theory and Comparative Politics,” World Politics (January 2001).

Kenneth Sharpe. William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Political Science at Swarthmore College.   An expert on foreign policy, Latin American politics, and U.S. drug enforcement policies. Sharpe is the co-author of Drug War Politics: The Price of Denial(University of California, 1996), which examines the ineffectiveness of the America’s punitive narcotics policy and calls instead for a public-health approach that aims to reduce demand for drugs. He has done extensive field research in Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador and the Dominican Republic. Sharpe, who has testified before Congress on numerous occasions about drug enforcement, has written several books analyzing, among other issues, the political economy of the Mexican auto industry, the relationship between U.S. foreign policy and constitutional democracy, and the imperial presidency. He received his Ph.D. in 1974 from Yale University and his M.Sc. in 1967 from the London School of Economics.

 

UBC Advisors

 

Maxwell A. Cameron. Professor of Political Science, University of British Columbia. PhD UC Berkeley, 1989. Author of Democracy and Authoritarianism in Peru (St. Martin’s 1994); co-editor of The Peruvian Labyrinth (Penn State, 1997), The Political Economy of North American Free Trade (McGill-Queen’s 1993),Democracy and Foreign Policy (Carleton, 1995), To Walk Without Fear: The Global Movement to Ban Landmines (Oxford, 1998); co-author of The Making of NAFTA: How the Deal Was Done (Cornell, 2000). Edited Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies (2002) thematic issue on democracy in Latin America and Canadian Foreign Policy (2003) thematic issue on the Inter-American Democratic Charter. Currently writing a book on democracy without the separation of powers. Served on the editorial boards of Business and Politics, the Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Revista de Ciencia Politica (Chile) and Convergencia: Revista de Ciencia Sociales (Mexico). On leave at Yale University as Canadian Bicenntenial Visiting Professor in the Yale Center for International and Area Studies during fall 2005. During 2006 visiting researcher at the Universidad del Pacifico in Lima, and political advisor to Lloyd Axworthy, Chief of the Electoral Observation Mission of the Organization of American States in Peru. Co-organized a workshop on “Left Turns?” funded by the Peter Wall Institute of Advanced Studies, May 2007.

 

R. Kenneth Carty. Professor of Political Science and the Brenda & David McLean Chair in Canadian Studiesat the University of British Columbia and Director of the Centre for the Study of Democratic Institutions. He is a former Head of the Department of Political Science (1996-2001, 2006-07) and a Past President of the Canadian Political Science Association. During 2005 he was a Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the Peter Wall Institute of Advanced Studies. Since 1991 he has chaired UBC Press, Canada’s leading publisher of social science research. Carty has been active as a consultant to both national and provincial Royal Commissions of Inquiry, the CBC Ombudsman, and the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada. He was appointed by the Speaker of the House of Commons to be a member of the last federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for British Columbia and during 2003-04 served as the Director of Research for the BC Citizens’ Assembly on Electoral Reform, an innovative exercise in citizen engagement.  Carty’s scholarship has been primarily concerned with political parties and electoral systems and he has published widely (11 authored / edited books and over 60 refereed articles / book chapters) on politics in Europe, Canada and Australia. His most recent book (co-authored with Munroe Eagles, a political geographer) is Politics is Local: National Politics at the Grassroots, (Oxford University Press, 2005).

 

Mark E. Warren. Teaches political theory at the University of British Columbia, where he holds the Harold and Dorrie Merilees Chair for the Study of Democracy. Prior to his move to UBC in 2004, Warren taught at Georgetown University. His current research interests include new forms of citizen participation and democratic representation, the relationship between civil society and democracy, and political corruption. He is author of Democracy and Association (Princeton University Press, 2001), which was the 2003 winner of the Elaine and David Spitz Book Prize for Democracy and Association, awarded by the Conference for the Study of Political Thought, and also received the 2003 Outstanding Book Award from the Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action (ARNOVA). Warren’s research has appeared in journals such as the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, andPolitical Theory. He is co-editor of Designing Deliberative Democracy: The British Columbia Citizens’ Assembly, which will be released by Cambridge University Press in early 2008.

Allan Tupper. Professor of Political Science at the University of British Columbia. A native of Ottawa, Dr. Tupper is a graduate of Carleton University (BA, DPA, MA) and Queen’s University where he received his PhD in Political Studies in 1977. From 2002 and until 2006, Dr. Tupper was Associate Vice President (Government Relations) at UBC. Prior to that he was Professor of Political Science at the University of Alberta from 1976 to 2002. While at the University of Alberta, Dr. Tupper was as Chair of the Department of Political Science, Associate Dean of Arts and Associate Vice President (Government Relations). He was also Vice President (Academic) at Acadia University. His major teaching and research interests are Canadian politics and public policy, western Canadian politics and public policy, and public administration. Professor Tupper has published extensively on these and other topics including federal-provincial relations and post secondary education policy. He has authored or edited six books and many articles and chapters. Between 1998 and 2004, Dr. Tupper was Editor of Canadian Public Administration, the internationally recognized journal of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada. In 2003, he was appointed Senior Academic Fellow of the Canada School for Public Service in Ottawa, the Government of Canada’s executive development agency. Dr. Tupper is actively involved in community outreach, public speaking and media relations. He is an advocate of outstanding university teaching, university leadership in public debates and closer links between faculties within universities. He is a frequent commentator on regional and national media. Dr. Tupper was co-chair of the Advisory Committee on National Affairs to Hon. Ralph Klein, Premier of Alberta. He also chaired a major review of Alberta’s conflicts of interest legislation that called for major changes. Among many other activities, Dr. Tupper was a member of the Canadian delegation to the United Nations Election Monitoring Mission during the historic 1994 general elections in South Africa. In 2006, he was a member of the Triple R (Roles, Responsibilities and Relationships) Review Committee that examined important aspects of governance in the City of Vancouver. He is actively involved in national professional associations and has served on the boards of the Canadian Political Science Association and the Institute of Public Administration of Canada. Since 1991, he has been listed in Canadian Who’s Who. In 2006, he was awarded the Lt. Governor’s Medal for Excellence in Public Administration.

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